The Crapshoot
It's dangerous to be a pedestrian.
Phillip Hong
26 June, 2008


The first Friday in March. Forecasters were suggesting that people stay home and avoid any unncessary travel. Snow eventually waded and topped to my hips by the weekend. It certainly looked like a good time to stay home.

I was doing my part for the environment and walking from the grocery store for some much needed staples.

Even though the snow piled on and the driving conditions were near whiteout visibility, the drivers in their gas-guzzling machines still drove on like it was clear sunshine. Some still raced like they were competing against everyone else for control of the snow covered, blizzard packed road.

As I crossed the two lane road, with a posted speed limit of forty kilometres an hour, a man in a Honda sixteen-seater twelve-thousand-metre guzzler suddenly raced up, skidded near me and started beeping repeatedly like Italy won another soccer match.

I continued on, in defiance, in fury.

What kind of bonehead believes that speeding, even in residential neighbourhoods, is somehow acceptable to society? Considering the extremely large parking lot inbetween the street I live in, a seniors complex, and the grocery store, I can only pray for those not as mobile as me.

Does owning a car automatically give you right of way?

In another instance, I was walking on an intersection that crosses the road down to the seniors complex. Meanwhile, a Toyota truck, part of a long queue formed to enter the plaza, suddenly stopped just before he hit me, dead centre near his lane.

Considering I was already walking across before he even not-stopped at the four way intersection, one can only say that he did not observe his surroundings.

We need to find a way to tell drivers that careless driving is not acceptable. I don't just mean behaviour that's criminal.

Drivers: Please do take care where you're going. It's not just your road.

Phillip Hong, a Woodbridge resident, is a an endless tourist. Check out the interesting experiences of his journeys on The Travelling Briefcase.
Editor: Phillip Hong
     
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