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Good or bad can come from bailout rejection
 
Frank Cotolo
29 Sep 2008
 
WASHINGTON, D.C. - When the President's bailout plan was rejected by the legislature, many economists ran to their legal pads to make notes on the possible economic impact. Also, many people who weren't economists and did not have legal pads began to speculate.
 
With only weeks left until the Presidential election, both candidates were also speculating what would happen, as well as what to do about whatever happened.
 
A spokesperson from the Barack Obama camp said, "Mr. Obama wants to do something about all of this and if he becomes President, he will. Right now he is thinking that there can only be something done about this when something occurs from this."
 
The Stock Market took an historic dip after the bailout plan failed.
 
"Mr. McCain," said someone from the John McCain camp, "is sorry that nothing came of the bailout. He feels the bailout could have made something better but even members of his own party disagreed, thinking the bailout would do more harm than good. Mr. McCain is definitely for more good than harm coming from any of this financial turmoil."
 
A spokesperson from the Barack Obama camp replied to the McCain camp by saying that Mr. Obama "wants good than harm to come from any of this financial turmoil even more than Mr. McCain wants it."
 
The McCain camp disagreed, responding to the Obama-camp response by saying, "Mr. Obama isn't experienced enough to want good than harm to come from any of this financial turmoil even more than Mr. McCain wants it."
 
Both candidates' camps went to their corners to come up with exact numbers to indicate which candidate wants more good to be the result of the current financial crisis. Meanwhile, everyone awaits to see if further damage occurs during this week.
   
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